300,000 more apprenticeships needed

Although a record number of young people are on apprenticeships, a new report has called for a radical increase to boost the economy and social mobility.

The Sutton Trust report draws on what’s happening in other countries to set out a plan to transform skills and opportunities for young people in England.

The report claims that last year our international competitors created more apprenticeships, especially at level 3; per 1000 staff, the number of new apprenticeships was:

  • 43 in Switzerland
  • 40 in Germany,
  • 39 in Australia,
  • 33 in Austria and
  • six in the UK.

Sir Peter Lampl, chairman of the Sutton trust, said: England’s patchwork vocational system not only hinders out economic performance, it prevents hundreds of thousands of young people from gaining good job skills. Many countries value those who train in the workplace and study at the same time as highly, if not more highly, than those who attend university.  We need a step change in the provision of real apprenticeships for all occupations, from bankers to bakers, and a revolution in how they are regarded in society.”

Amongst the report’s recommendations are the creation of 300,000 high quality three-year apprenticeships and radical improvements to careers advice in schools.

However, the Association of Colleges questions whether the proposals are realistic, FE News reports. “Creating 300,000 apprenticeships, when the report acknowledges there is already a shortage of apprenticeship places for 16 to 18 year-olds, would be a massive challenge,” its Teresa Frith said, “Although we agree that there is a business case for employers to take on apprentices, at the moment too few do.”

Do you agree with the recommendations from the Sutton Trust, or are they simply unrealistic?

5 thoughts on “300,000 more apprenticeships needed

  1. Regrettably schools have a vested interest in feeding their own sixth forms and, therefore, 16 year olds will often be persuaded that academic qualifications serve their best interests whether this is so or not. At age 18 the situation does not change a great deal. Because all teachers went to university most find it difficult to see the advantages of a vocational route; this is made worse by the fact that schools see the numbers of students they get to university as a mark of their success which they can use for publicity purposes. In short I believe teachers can be the worst possible people to advise students, especially as so many of them have little or no experience of the world of work.

  2. Dear sir the vocational route for students or the nvq route is a waste of time,Lets look at painting and decorating.You have teachers, lol who are not decorators cannot paperhang ect no or very little experience in this basic of fields.so how can this be beneficial to students.yes

    they have a teaching qual but no or very little experience in the given field.

  3. Dear sir the vocational route for students or the nvq route is a waste of time,Lets look at painting and decorating.You have teachers, lol who are not decorators cannot paperhang ect no or very little experience in this basic of fields.so how can this be beneficial to students.yes they have a teaching qualification but no trade experience this can not be good for the students. but I can not blame the teachers lol for taking the money.
    will any thing be done about this not at al cary on giving nvq, out like confetti lol again

    thanks for your time d towers advanced city and guilds holder no nvq,s taken or wanted

    they have a teaching qual but no or very little experience in the given field.

  4. Wholeheartedly agree with Frank; schools need (financially) to keep their pupils on to 6th form as long as they are academically able – it is only those that fall short that are ‘released’ to FE colleges or Apprenticeships which is a complete sham and totally unfair to students.

  5. The problem here is that governments do not think about school management or the future of young people when they create policy, they think about what keeps them in office. It was government that created league tables and ofsted and they have continued to interfere in the running of schools to the detriment of students. Recently I tried to introduce marketing and management courses at Level 2, with a view to preparing students for industry and increasing their marketability, the plan: to forge partnerships with local industry in order to acquire two year internships for year 12-13 students with a view to an apprenticeship and a funded degree. Was it accepted? No! Why? Because marketing and management are not on Gove’s list of ‘vocational courses’ which attract points for the school. Let’s face the facts! Just how many painters and decorators, hairdressers, plumbers and electricians can we find jobs for. And this is where young people really get ‘sold-out’. Open yellow pages and look at the sections offering such services. As someone experienced in business, when trying to think of a new idea for a business, I would avoid any of those because the competition is ridiculously fierce. Managers and marketeers, on the other hand, have transferable skills and, therefore, mobility.

    In the school where I work, there are teaching staff, who have experience of industry, offering advice, and highly experienced people like myself working with, and offering advice to, young people, and I feel sure there are many other similar situations in schools around the Country. I’m so tired of government quangos ( I thought they had been done away with) and committees, many of which, have no experience of what employers really require. It would make me feel more confident if I knew there were serious industry heroes advising what they really require from their future employees. I would advocate not just more education but more of both industry experience and education.

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